See all Profiles
J Knight Headshot of Tyree
Faculty
Faculty

Tia C. M. Tyree, PHD (She/Her)

Professor

  • Strategic, Legal & Management Communication
  • School of Communications

Biography

Dr. Tia C. M. Tyree is a Professor at Howard University. She teaches graduate and undergraduate communications courses with a focus on strategic communications, social media and African Americans. Her research interests include hip hop, rap, reality television, film, social media as well as African-American and female representations in media. She has several published book chapters and peer-reviewed articles in journals, such as those in Women and LanguageHoward Journal of CommunicationsJournalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Journal of Black Studies and the International Journal of Emergency Management. She is the author of The Interesting and Incredibly Long History of American Public Relations and coeditor of HBCU Experience – The BookSocial Media: Pedagogy and Practice as well as Social Media: Culture and Identity. She is also cofounder of the Social Media Technology Conference and Workshop, which is a conference designed to bring both professionals and academicians together to discuss cutting-edge research and trends in social media.

Education & Expertise

Education

Publications Design

M.A.
University of Baltimore
2000

Telecommunications

B.S.
Morgan State University
1995

Mass Communication and Media Studies

Ph.D.
Howard University
2007

Expertise

Women, Women in Mass Media, African American Women in Mass Media, Social Media, Rap, Hip Hop, Reality Television, African American in Cartoons

Academics

Academics

Social Media & ICM

This course is designed to provide students with the history, theory and practical uses of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC), along with the legal and ethical issues associated with social media. This course requires students to create comprehensive ISC campaigns with an emphasis on targeted uses of social media channels and tactics.  

CapComm Lab

The Capstone Communications Laboratory, known as CapComm Lab, is designed to provide an opportunity for students to gain practical experience through a course that functions like a student-run strategic communications firm. The course is taken by advertising and public relations students, and it emphasizes planning, developing, implementing and evaluating strategic campaigns for a paying client. CapComm Lab provides a rigorous professional-level challenge for students entering the business world or pursuing graduate education. CapComm Lab also provides students with the opportunity to stock their portfolios with real-world examples of their best creative works and examples of their strategic thinking skills. 

Research

Research

Group Information

Tyree, Tia C.M. (2022). #ThisIsAmerica: Rappers, Racism, and Twitter. In Roy Christopher, (Ed.), Hip-Hop Theory: Time, Technology, and the Future. MIT Press: Cambridge, MA. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. & Powell, Aisha (2022). African American Women’s Representations on Television, Journal of African American Studies.  

 

 

Tyree, Tia C.M. & Williams, Melvin. (2021). Black Women Rap Battles: A Textual Analysis of US Rap Diss Songs. Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture, 25 (1), 64-86. 

 

Somani, Indira & Tyree, Tia C. M. (2021). Black Broadcast Journalists: Implications of Mentorship and Race in the Newsroom, Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 76 (2), 176-201. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2020). (Guest Editor) African American Representation. Howard Journal of Communications, 31 (5).  

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2020).  African American Representation: Introduction. Howard Journal of Communications, 31(5) 411-414. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2020). Speak up, Sis: Black Women, Race and News Coverage of the Me Too Movement. In Joan McAlister and Marnel Goins. The Routledge International Handbook of Gender and Communication. 

 

Williams, M. & Tyree, Tia C. M. (2019). The “Un-Quiet Queen”: An Analysis of Rapper Nicki Minaj in the Fame Comic Book. In Adrienne Trier-Bieniek, (Ed.), Feminist Theory and Pop Culture. 2nd. Edition. Sense Publishers: Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. & Jones, Michelle. (2018). How Michelle Obama Uses Her Social Media Presence to Support the Black Community: An Analysis of the FLOTUS Presidential Initiatives Through the Lens of Black Feminism. Women and Language, 41(2), 7-30. 

 

Williams, M. & Tyree, Tia C. M. (2018). How to Be a Postfeminist: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Celebrity Culture, Sexual Messages, and Feminism in Amber Rose’s How to Be a Bad Bitch. In Carol Madere, How Celebrity Lives Affect Our Own: Understanding the Impact on Americans’ Public and Private Lives, (pp. 222-249). Roman and Littlefield: Lanham, MD.   

 

Tyree Tia C. M. (2017). Making Movie Money: A 25-Year Analysis of Rappers’ Acting Roles in Hollywood Movies. Journal of Hip Hop Studies, 4(1), 118-147. 

 

Tyree, Tia. C. M. (2017). How Rich Media and Discussion Boards in Online Classes can foster student learning and an understanding of online social activism: a special focus on Black Lives Matter. In S. Ferris, H. Wilder & W. Paterson (Eds.), Unplugged from the classroom.  Elsevier: Amsterdam.  

 

Tyree, Tia. C. M. & Kirby, M. (2017). #THOTsBeLike: The Construction of the New Female Sexual Stereotype in Social Media. In Kehbuma Langmia & Tia Tyree, Social Media: Culture and Identity. Lexington Books: Lanham, MD.   

 

Mills, B., Dovil, M., Williams, L. & Tyree, T. (2017). How Minorities Use Social Media During Weather Related Crises: Results of a U.S. National Weather Survey. In K. Langmia & T. Tyree (Eds.), Social Media: Culture and Identity. Lexington Books: Lanham, MD. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. & Hill, M. (2016). Hurricane Katrina 10 Years Later: A Qualitative Meta Analysis of Communications and Media Studies of New Orleans’ Black Community. International Journal of Emergency Management. 12(3), 304-327. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. & Williams, M. (2016). Flawless Feminist or Fallible Freak?:  

An Analysis of Feminism, Empowerment and Gender in Beyoncé’s Lyrics. In Dr. Adrienne Trier-Bieniek (Ed.), The Beyoncé Effect: Essays on Sexuality, Race and Feminism. McFarland Publishing: Jefferson, North Carolina. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2016). Potential Impact of Social Media on Media and Stranded New Orleans Residents. In Kathleen Fearn-Banks (Ed.), Crisis Communication: A Casebook Approach (5th Edition). Routledge: New York, NY 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2016). Disregarding Negative Statements about the Failures of Race-Gender Mentoring Pairings: How A White Man Can Mentor a Young Black Woman from a Bachelor’s Degree to a Ph.D. In Sonja M. Brown Givens (Ed.), Critical examinations of women of color navigating mentoring relationships. Peter Lang: New York, NY. 

 

Tyree, Tia. C. M., (2016). Making a video and making a difference using social media: A “call to action” approach. Teaching Media Quarterly, 4(1). 

 

Tyree, Tia. C. M. & Cathcart, C. (2016). Understanding, Celebrating and Maintaining the “HBCU Experience.” In Charles Prince and Rochelle Ford (Eds.), Setting a New Agenda for Student Engagement and Retention in Historically Black Colleges and Universities. IGI Global: Hershey, Pennsylvania. 

 

Williams, M., Tyree, Tia C. M. & Lewis, M. (2015). My Hair Is “Layed” Like Cyberqueer: Video Blogging, Computer Cross-Dressing, and the Curious Case of Funky Dineva. Spectrum: A Journal on Black Men. 3(2), 1-24 

Tyree, Tia C. M. & Jones, M. (2015). The “Adored” Woman in Rap: An Analysis of the Presence of Philogyny in Rap Music. Women’s Studies. 44(1), 54-83. 

 

Williams, M. & Tyree, Tia C. M. (2015). The “Un-Quiet Queen”: An Analysis of Rapper Nicki Minaj in the Fame Comic Book. In Adrienne Trier-Bieniek, (Ed.), Feminist Theory and Pop Culture. Sense Publishers: Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. & Jacobs, L. (2014). Can you save me?: Black Male Superheroes in Films. Spectrum: A Journal on Black Men. 3(1), 1-24 

 

Jacobs, L.; Tyree, T. & Clemons, D. (2013). The Construction of Femininity, Race and Sexuality in Alcohol Advertisements in South African and American Women Magazines. Gender and Behavior, 11(2), 5788-5803. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2013). Using Social Media and Developing Social Media Courses. In K. Langmia, T. Tyree, P. O’Brien,  & I. Sturgis, (Eds). Social Media: Pedagogy & Practice.  University Press of America: Lanham, MD. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2013). Using Twitter to Assist Students in Writing a Concise Nutgraph, In S. Ferris, H. Wilder & W. Paterson (Eds.), The Plugged-In Professor: Tips and techniques for teaching with social media. Woodhead Publishing: Cambridge.  

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2013). Contemporary Representations of Black Females in Newspaper Comic Strips, In S. Howard & R. Jackson II (Eds.), Black Comics: Politics of Race and Representation. Michigan: University of Michigan Press.  

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2012). Gender and Sexuality Representations in Hip Hop. Teaching Media Quarterly, 1(3). 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. Byerly, C. & Hamilton, K. (2012). Representations of (New) Black Masculinity: A news making case study. Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism.  

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2011). African American Stereotypical Characters in Reality Television, Howard Journal of Communication, 22(4): 394-413. 

 

Tyree, T. & Krishnasamy, A. (2011). Bringing Afrocentricity to the Funnies: An Analysis of Afrocentricity within Aaron McGruder’s The Boondocks. Journal of Black Studies, 42: 23-42. 

 

Tyree, Tia C. M. (2009). Lovin’ Momma and Hatin’ on Baby Mama: A Comparison of Misogynistic and Stereotypical Representation in Songs about Rappers’ Mothers and Baby Mamas. Women and Language, 32(2), 49-58.