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Professor Featherstone
Faculty
Faculty

Raven Featherstone, MA, MFA

Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Graphic Design Program

  • Art Department
  • College of Fine Arts

Biography

Raven Featherstone embarked upon a career in Design and Photography with an emphasis in Computer Graphic Design and Motion Design. Held an internship with Master Printmaker, Lou Stovall. Featherstone received a degree from Maryland Institute College of Art with a Master of Art (MA) degree in Digital Arts and Pratt Institute with a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Computer Graphics and Interactive Media. She is a member of the Women's Caucus for Art in Greater Washington, DC, Siggraph ACM, member of the Women museum, Smithsonian Institute, Hill Center Artist and Strathmore Artist.

Professor Featherstone teaches the Two-Dimensional Concepts I/II, Typography I/II, and Production and Portfolio Techniques I/II and Studio Problems in Design courses at Howard University. In Washington, DC area, Raven has exhibited her work throughout the United States, Including Hill Center on Capital Hill, Touchstone Gallery, Manayunk-Roxborough Art Center in Philadelphia and Women Made Gallery in Chicago and many more.  Featherstone has traveled extensively around the world from Europe, Africa and Asia, studying the culture and arts of these regions.

 

Education & Expertise

Education

Computer Graphics and Interactive Media

M.F.A.
Pratt Institute
2006

Digital Arts

M.A.
Maryland Institute College of Art
2004

Graphic Design and Photography

B.F.A.
Howard University
2003

Corcoran Continuing Education program

Workshop- Web Design for Professionals
George Washington University
Summer 2015 July 6 -10th

MICA Open Studies program

A Casebound Books & Marbled Paper -Workshop
Maryland Institute College of Art
January 11, 2020 - January 18, 2020

Expertise

Graphic and Motion Designer and a cross-disciplinary Artist

I am an experienced and versatile graphic designer, photographer and multimedia/Digital artist with over 20 years of experience working in computer graphics within diverse industries. 

Academics

Academics

Two-Dimensional Concepts I (UG)

To gain an understanding of the BASIC ELEMENTS of 2- Dimensional Design-Line, Direction, Shape, Size, Texture, Value, and Color along with the PRINCIPALS OF DESIGN- Repetition, Alternation, Harmony, Gradation, Contrast, (Opposition, or Conflict), Dominance, Unity, Balance. These along with form are building blocks that are essential in the process of making a visual statement.

Two-Dimensional Concepts II (UG)

DESCRIPTION: A visual exploration of the nature of color and its interaction with applied design.OBJECTIVES:    To awaken within the student an understanding and appreciation for color and its interaction with applied design. To prepare the student with a command of color and design principles through the creative manipulation and organization of various mediums and materials at the fundamental level.

Typography I (UG)

This course includes the history, design and execution of lettering for reproduction. The computer is employed to introduce the student to the basic principles of typographic design and typesetting. With the use of actual typographic design situations, the course instructs the student in the use of type as an intrinsic element of graphic communication, including principles, which determine typeface selection (to visually communicate the desired effect) and the appreciation of letterforms. Typesetting and typographic layout on the computer are stressed.

Scope of Course: This course deals with the understanding and application of typography, and techniques for the use of typography in graphic design, photographs, computer graphics, illustration, etc. Course Objectives: Upon successfully completing the course, learners will be able to: At the end of the semester, students will have gained a thorough understanding of the aspects of good typography and be able to apply them to design solutions. Students will develop proficiency with tools (X-acto knife, Pica ruler, T-square) and software applications (Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign)

Typography II (UG)

This course is a continuation of Typography I. It requires basic knowledge of the history, design and execution of lettering for reproduction. With the use of actual typographic design situations, the course instructs the student in the use of type as an intrinsic element of graphic communication, including principles which determine typeface selection (to visually communicate the desired effect) and the importance of designing within a grid. Typesetting and typographic layout on the computer are stressed.This course deals with the further understanding and application of typography, and techniques for the use of typography in graphic design, photographs, computer graphics, illustration, etc. Toward the end of the semester the students will be introduced to After Effect and will create a motion graphic piece. Furthermore, the course focuses on the art of motion design and compositing, including limited 2-D animation and mixed media. Using images, graphics, video footage, and sound, students explore the relationships of motion, pacing, textures, transparency, transitions, design, and composition in space and time.  The course demonstrating our awareness of graphic design on a more global level, three example of non-western design within the categories of package design, advertising design, publication design, information design and type design. These examples reflect the differences between designs of various parts of the world. 

Production and Portfolio Techniques I (UG)

OBJECTIVE:There will be instruction in the production and presentation of the designer’s work from drawing board to the printed page and digitally. Methods and techniques of presenting her / his work to prospective employers will be stressed. The methods of selling oneself to an employer, and selling one’s work to a client will be discussed. If a student’s work is at the level of development which allows her / him to benefit from working as an apprentice in a professional studio of an appropriate area of career interest the student will be required to seek and gain on the experience.

Production and Portfolio Techniques II (UG)

A continuation course from Production and Portfolio Techniques I, is an introduction to ethics and code of conduct for the professional practices of the creative field. Course topics will address, but are not limited to, career development and direction, the craft of portfolio preparation and presentation techniques, usage of trade tools, and the business of self-promotion and marketing. Course work will consist of lectures, studio/lab work, and a semester projects. Students will also experience a trip to the field and at least one Creative Professional guest speaker. Students will create a high impact print/electronic Self-promotion campaign to be distributed to potential clients, employers and/or prospective graduate schools.

Typography I (G)

Typography II (G)

Studio Problems in Design (UG)

COURSE DESCRIPTION:Development of graphic and verbal articulation in package design and display {exhibit design}, with study of agency practice and communication design. To provide students with a foundation in development of graphic and visual verbal articulation in package design and display, with study of agency practices and communication design. This course covers food, beverage, furniture, toy, gaming, and entertainment industries in product packaging. Students will develop an understanding of sustainable / renewable product packaging and multi- purpose packaging.Understanding the difference between two-dimensional thinking - there is a difference in attitude. A three-dimensional designer should be capable of visualizing mentally the whole form and rotating in mentally in all direction, as if he or she had it in their hands. One should not confuse the image to one or two views, but should thoroughly explore the play of depth and flow of space, the impact of mass and the nature of different materials. Therefore, to start thinking three-dimensionally we must, first know the three primary directions, which are length, width and depth.In order to obtain the three dimensions of any object, we must take measurements in the vertical, horizontal, and transverse directions. Thus the three primary directions consist of a vertical direction which goes up and down, a horizontal direction which goes left and right and a transverse direction which goes forward and backward.

Research

Research

Specialty

Artist’s Books and Computer Graphics

Funding

Howard University's Office of Research Development

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