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Faculty
Faculty

Pratibha Dev

Associate Professor

  • Physics and Astronomy
  • College of Arts & Sciences

Biography

   

Pratibha Dev received her PhD in theoretical condensed matter physics at the University at Buffalo. She joined the Howard University in 2015, where she is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Her research spans a range of topics across disciplinary boundaries. She is currently investigating novel 2D materials for nanoelectronic devices, hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in solar cell technology and the physics of defect centers in solids of interest in nanoscale sensing and quantum information. 

Education & Expertise

Education

Physics

Ph.D.
University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
2009

Physics

M.S.
Miranda House College, Delhi University, India

Physics

B.S.
Miranda House College, Delhi University, India

Expertise

Condensed Matter Physics, Quantum Chemistry and Materials Science

We are theoretical physicists, interested in investigating different properties of bulk, nanostructured and composite materials using ab-initio computational methods. We are interested in an array of topics at the interface of Condensed Matter Physics, Quantum Chemistry and Materials Science, including novel 2D materials and their stacks, hybrid nanomaterials, organic crystals and the physics of defect centers in solids.  

Academics

Academics

PHYS 015: Introduction to Modern Physics (Offered in Fall)

Level:  Undergraduate CoursePrerequisites: Calculus and AlgebraMaterial Covered: Special Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and their applications in different fields of PhysicsBook(s) Used:  Modern Physics by Serway, Moses & Moyer (3rd Edition)

PHYS 226: Solid State Physics - I (Offered in Spring)

Level:  Graduate and Undergraduate CoursePrerequisites:  Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetic Theory, and (some) Thermal & Statistical Mechanics (all prerequisites - at least at the undergraduate level)Material Covered:  Very briefly, the following will be covered:Static and dynamic aspects of structural properties of crystalline materialsElectronic properties of solidsSemiconductor PhysicsBook(s) Used: (1) Introduction to Solid State Physics by Kittel (7th edition or later)                        (2) Solid State Physics by Ashcroft & Mermin (1st edition)

PHYS 220: Quantum Mechanics - I (Offered in Fall)

Level:  Graduate CoursePrerequisites:  Undergraduate-level Quantum Mechanics (or at the minimum, Modern Physics), Electromagnetic Theory, and Mathematical Physics (all prerequisites - at least at the undergraduate level)Material Covered:  This is the first of the two-semester course. We will cover a range of topics over the course of two semesters (not necessarily in this order): brief discussion of old quantum theory, wavefunctions and Schrodinger’s equation, abstract formulation of quantum mechanics, Dirac notation, operators, vector spaces, symmetry, spins, addition of angular momentum, approximation methods (perturbation theory and variational method) and scattering theory, etc. Along the way, we will look at the application of quantum mechanical ideas to explain phenomena within different fields of physics and chemistry. Book(s) Used: There is no textbook for the course. I will try to make my lectures as self-contained as possible. However, you are encouraged to acquire one or more of the following books to supplement the notes (a non-comprehensive list): Quantum Mechanics, C. Cohen-Tannoudji, B. Diu and F. Laloe: Two volumes, good for self study. Highly recommended. Quantum Mechanics, L.I. Schiff: A solid old-fashioned graduate textbook. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics, G. Baym: A very good graduate textbook, with a concise and sophisticated exposition. Modern Quantum Mechanics, J.J. Sakurai: Another good book, with good examples.The Feynman Lectures on Physics, vol. III, R.P. Feynman: Great for gaining physical insights. Quantum Mechanics, F. Schwabl: Concise text.

Phys 221: Quantum Mechanics - II (Offered in Spring)

Level:  Graduate CoursePrerequisites:  Graduate-level Quantum Mechanics - I (PHYS-220)Material Covered:  This is the second of the two-semester course. We will cover a range of topics over the course of the semester: addition of angular momentum, approximation methods (perturbation theory and variational method) and scattering theory. Book(s) Used: There is no textbook for the course. I will try to make my lectures as self-contained as possible. However, you are encouraged to acquire one or more of the following books to supplement the notes (a non-comprehensive list): Quantum Mechanics, C. Cohen-Tannoudji, B. Diu and F. Laloe: Two volumes, good for self study. Highly recommended. Quantum Mechanics, L.I. Schiff: A solid old-fashioned graduate textbook. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics, G. Baym: A very good graduate textbook, with a concise and sophisticated exposition. Modern Quantum Mechanics, J.J. Sakurai: Another good book, with good examples.The Feynman Lectures on Physics, vol. III, R.P. Feynman: Great for gaining physical insights. Quantum Mechanics, F. Schwabl: Concise text.

Research

Research

Specialty

Condensed Matter Physics, Quantum Chemistry and Material Science

Funding

National Science Foundation

W. M. Keck Foundation

Group Information

Research Scientists:

Ivan Naumov

Sharmila Shirodkar

Graduate Students:

Cyrille Armel Sayou Ngomsi

Sai Krishna Narayanan

Alumni:

Tamanna Joshi (Ph.D. Degree; 2022)

Christina McBean (Undergraduate Research; Senior Thesis)

Priyanka Manchanda  (Postdoctoral Researcher 2018-2021)

Pankaj Kumar  (Postdoctoral Researcher 2019-2020)

Olasunbo Farinre (M.S. Degree)

Bipul Poudyal (Undergraduate Research)

Kevaughn Johnson (Undergraduate Research)

Naomi Haddock (Undergraduate Research)

Accomplishments

Accomplishments

Annual NRC/ASEE Postdoctoral Research Publication Award, 2016

Annual NRC/ASEE Postdoctoral Research Publication Award, 2016 for the article:“Stabilizing graphene-based organometallic sandwich structures through defect engineering,” Phys. Rev. B, 91, 035436 (2015). This is an award by Fellowships Office of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Chemistry Division Award (NRL), 2015

Chemistry Division Award (NRL), 2015 for the article: “van der Waals screening by single-layer graphene and molybdenum disulphide,” ACS Nano, 8 (12), 12410-12417 (2014). This citation honors superior quality of research accomplished and technical writing.

National Research Council (NRC) Fellowship

As an NRC fellow, I worked in the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington D.C. from 2012-2015.

EMPOWER Fellowship recipient, Irish Research Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (IRCSET)

The aim of the EMPOWER fellowship was to allow international researchers to work in Ireland, creating and supporting a vibrant research atmosphere in Ireland. As an EMPOWER Fellow, I worked in University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland from 2010-2012.

College of Arts and Sciences Dissertation Fellowship, 2008-2009, Physics Department, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY