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Faculty
Faculty

Matthew Franke

Master Instructor – Coordinator of Music History

  • Department of Music
  • College of Fine Arts

Biography

  Dr. Matthew Franke joined the Department of Music in 2015. Prior to coming to Howard, he taught music history at Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia. He holds a Ph.D. in musicology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2014).At Howard, he teaches courses on the history of Western classical music, popular music, music appreciation, and music theory. The chief Division A courses he teaches are Introduction to Music (MUSC 100) and Global Popular Music (MUSC 110). Dr. Franke is also responsible for the music history sequence for majors and minors (MUSC 010, 011, and 012) and for music fundamentals (MUSB 001). His research focuses on French and Italian opera in the 1890s, with a particular focus on the operas of Massenet, Bizet, and Puccini. His dissertation (“The Impact of Jules Massenet’s Opera’s in Milan, 1893–1903”) was partially funded by a grant from the Council for European Studies. He has published articles and book chapters on nineteenth-century French and Italian opera, contributed to the New Grove Dictionary of American Music, and published book reviews in the Indiana Theory Review, Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association, and MAKE Literary Magazine.He is also the curator of the List of Open-Access Music Journals, which is the single largest online collection of freely-accessible scholarship on music. You can find the database on his personal site.Dr. Franke is an active presenter and chair at conferences and colloquia. He has presented papers at national meetings of the American Musicological Society, the Society for American Music, the International Congress on Medieval Studies, and the Biennial Conference on Nineteenth-Century Music, as well as at international conferences in Italy and the United Kingdom. In recent years, he has given invited lectures at Catholic University and Shenandoah Conservatory and chaired sessions at local and national meetings of the American Musicological Society.Dr. Franke is a member of the American Musicological Society and is on the editorial staff of the Zeitschrift der Gesellschaft für Musiktheorie.Publications:"The Harp, the Lied and Ossianic Narratives in Massenet's Werther." Nineteenth-Century Music Review. DOI: 10.1017/S147940982000004X"How Carmen Became a Repertory Opera in Italy and in Italian." In Carmen Abroad, ed. Clair Rowden and Richard Langham Smith (Cambridge University Press, 2020)."The Disappearance of Grand Opera, or How a Genre Leaves the Canon." Chapter in A-R Editions: Online Music Anthology (2020). https://www.armusicanthology.com/ViewerPlus.aspx?&music_id=940"Final Exam Weighting as Part of Course Design." Teaching & Learning Inquiry 6, no. 1 (2018), 91 - 103 http://tlijournal.com/tli/index.php/TLI/article/view/174/199 Review: A Million Years of Music, by Gary Tomlinson. MAKE Literary Magazine, online edition (2018) http://makemag.com/review-a-million-years-of-music-by-gary-tomlinson/ "Giuseppe Verdi." Chapter in A-R Editions: Online Music Anthology (2017) http://www.armusicanthology.com/anthology/Comp-Franke-Verdi.pdf "Preface/Prefazione." Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Concerto no. 3 for violin and piano, ed. Angelo Gilardino (Milan: Edizioni Curci, 2017). "Preface." Jules Massenet, Roma: Overture. (Munich: Musikproduktion Hoeflich, 2015)."Massenet's Italian Trip of 1894 and the Politics of Cultural Translation." in Massenet and the Mediterranean World, ed. Simone Ciolfi (Bologna:  Ut Orpheus, 2015), 161 - 71. Review. "The First Volume in  Ricordi's Puccini Edition." Review of Giacomo Puccini, Manon Lescaut (critical edition: Le opere di Giacomo Puccini), ed. Roger Parker. Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association 72, no. 1 (2015), 226 - 30.Review. Verdi Reception, edited by Lorenzo Frassa and Michela Niccolai. MAKE Literary Magazine, online edition (2014). http://makemag.com/review-verdi-reception/ Review. Le dramaturgie de Gustave Charpentier, by Michela Niccolai. Notes: Quarterly Journal of the Music Library Association 70, no. 2 (2013), 267 - 69.Review. The Cambridge Companion to Opera Studies, ed. by Nicholas Till. MAKE Literary Magazine, online edition (2013). http://makemag.com/review-the-cambridge-companion-to-opera-studies/ Review. A History of Opera, by Carolyn Abbate and Roger Parker. MAKE Literary Magazine, online edition (2013). http://makemag.com/review-a-history-of-opera/ "Stringfield, Lamar Edwin." revision of the entry by D.R. Nelson. The New Grove Dictionary of American Music (2013).Entries on popular musicians for NCPedia.org, an online encyclopedia of the State Library of North Carolina: "Amos, Tori"; "Clinton, George"; "Daniels, Charlie"; "Flack, Roberta"; "Roach, Max"; "Simone, Nina"; "Travis, Randy." (2012 - 2013) https://www.ncpedia.org/ "The Reception of Jules Massenet's Operas in Milan, 1893 - 1903." Perspectives on Europe 41, no. 2 (2011), 118 - 20.Review. Il Trittico, Turandot, and Puccini's Late Style, by Andrew Davis. Indiana Theory Review 29, no. 2 (2011), 105 - 12.

Education & Expertise

Education

Musicology

Ph.D.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2014

Musicology

M.A.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2009

Music

B.A.
University of Puget Sound
2007

Expertise

Music History, Musicology, Music Appreciation, Classical Music, Opera

Academics

Academics

MUSC 010: Music History I

This is the first semester the Department's history sequence for music majors and minors. (It's loosely equivalent to MUSC 005 on the old schemes). It's got loads of exciting connections to the ways we make music today, including some of the earliest surviving music theory and musical notation. The timeframe is roughly from "Antiquity" to 1680; in geographic terms, the music studied largely derives from cultures on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. A unique feature of this course is its emphasis on basic Medieval modal theory, which is different from the type you study in jazz. Success in this course requires regular attendance and preparation. Listen to the class playlists regularly! 

MUSC 011: Music History II

This is the second semester in the Department's history sequence for majors and minors. (It's loosely equivalent to MUSC 006 on the old schemes). This class focuses on the years 1680 to 1880, which saw the rise of "common practice" harmony and tonal practice, and the origins of many musical concepts we still employ today. Much of the music form this period still forms the core of the modern classical repertoire, including well-known musicians such as Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, and Verdi. This is also an exciting period in terms of black music history, as we have notated music by composers such as Ignatius Sancho, the Chevalier De Saint-Georges, and Blind Tom. Success in this class requires regular attendance and participation. Listen to the class playlists regularly!

MUSC 012: Music History III

This is the third semester in the Department's history sequence for majors and minors. (It's roughly equivalent to MUSC 007 on the old schemes). This is a survey of musical developments in the twentieth century--which means that this class includes discussion of jazz, rock, blues, and related traditions. Success in this class requires regular participation and attendance. Listen to the class playlists regularly!

MUSC 100: Introduction to Music

This is a Division A  music appreciation course. No prior musical experience is required to excel in this class. Assignments include theory homework and listening assignments.

MUSC 110: Global Popular Music

Love Afrobeat, reggae, Kpop, or Indian film songs? Or are you wondering why American artists are constantly mining other cultures' music for new sounds and beats? This might be the Division A class for you. There are no required textbooks for the class, because we'll be reading scholarly articles freely available to you through the databases hosted by the Howard University Library. Success in this class requires preparation--that means listening to the music and having a grasp of the readings--before you come to class. 

MUSB 001: Fundamentals of Music

If you have had no exposure to music theory or notation, and you're serious about studying music intensely, then this is the place to start. This class is not a Division A course, and is restricted to music majors and minors. (If you need a Division A course, please look at Introduction to Music or Global Popular Music). It's offered Pass-Fail--and per Department policy, you have to get at least an 85% in the course to pass. While that might sound scary, the class is not overwhelming if you're able to attend regularly, turn in assignments on time, and come to office hours if you have questions. It's capped at ten people, so there are lots of opportunities for us to interact.

Research

Research

Specialty

19th-century French and Italian opera; Jules Massenet; Georges Bizet; Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco