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Faculty
Faculty

Ezer Kang

Professor

  • Psychology
  • College of Arts & Sciences

Biography

I am professor of psychology and core faculty in the Clinical Psychology PhD Program. My research and clinical work converge on understanding how persons and communities interact in the context of poverty to influence the mental and physical well-being of persons living with HIV in US cities and the Global South.

Education & Expertise

Education

Psychology & Religious Studies

B.A.
New York University, New York
1992

Theology

M.A.
Fuller Theological Seminary, School of Theology, Pasadena
1996

Clinical Psychology (APA Accredited)

Ph.D.
Fuller Theological Seminary, Graduate School of Psychology, Pasadena
1999

Pre-Doctoral Clinical Psychology Internship
Boston University Medical Center, Center for Multicultural Training in Psychology (CMTP), Boston
1999

Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in HIV/AIDS
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York
2000

Academics

Academics

HIV and Applied Principles of Community Psychology (Undergraduate)

The disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in global cities coupled with a decrease in HIV mortality and morbidity have created an opportunity to apply principles and values of community psychology to help guide our understanding of the complex interplay of environmental and individual-level drivers that influence HIV primary prevention and care for persons living with HIV.  Community psychology, the study of person-environment interactions, offers a unique perspective on how social structures, neighborhoods, and individuals shape HIV prevention and care delivery particularly for communities living in urban poverty. Specific theories of participatory-action research, multi-level community interventions, structural dimensions of HIV stigma, HIV syndemic framework, and public health policy implications will be critically examined and discussed. 

Adult Neuropsychological Assessment (Doctoral)

This course introduces the theory and practice of neuropsychological assessment – a specialized field of clinical psychology that measures and interprets the relationships between human central nervous system functions (with a focus on the brain), cognition, emotion and behavior. The goal of assessment is to identify patterns of performance across different cognitive and behavioral domains that meaningfully influence people’s lives. You will learn the standard test battery, collaborative therapeutic neuropsychological assessment model (CTNA), and “hypothesis testing” approaches to assess for attention, processing speed, memory, language, executive functioning, visuospatial, reasoning, and motor function in adults. Particular attention will be given to race, ethnicity, gender, and social class - all of which can interactively influence cognitive function and test performance. Taken together, the underlying principle of this course is that neuropsychological assessment is not a “one-size-fits-all” practice because values, experiences, and social expectations of behavior can differ across settings, and these differences bear significantly on how we interpret and use our assessment findings.

Cognitive Psychology (Undergraduate)

This course presents an overview of research on and applications of cognitive psychology, “a study of how people perceive, learn, and think about information” (Sternberg, 2009). We will investigate everyday activities, and in doing so, much of our ordinary mental abilities would seem a bit more extraordinary. Cognitive psychology takes us behind the scenes of the simplest daily experiences - perception, attention, memory, language, reasoning, decision-making, and problem solving - and demonstrates the ridiculously complex processes that make it all happen. The objectives of this course will be to stimulate curiosity about how we juggle and apply information and knowledge, and to critically examine (and appreciate) major theories that have helped explain how we carry out everyday activities

Ethical Principles and Conduct in Health Service Psychology (Doctoral)

What values inform how psychologists practice as practitioners, scientists, and teachers? What constitutes proper professional conduct? Is the motivation “to do the right thing” sufficient? How do psychologists address “moral distress” when professional ethics and law collide? Handelsman and colleagues (2005) proposed that addressing these knotty questions (with real-world implications) requires more than simply applying a set of rules or algorithmic formulas, but calls for adapting a new professional “ethical culture” that is defined by a system of symbolic meanings (e.g., Ethical Standard 2.04) anchored in social institutions (i.e., American Psychological Association) and patterns of interpersonal interactions (psychologists and person receiving psychological services).  Just as many of you are adjusting to the rich culture at Howard this year, you will similarly begin the process of “ethical acculturation.” The goal of this course is to help you begin this process. By our mutual commitment to learn together, by the end of the course, students will be able to:

  1. View ethics as a way to promote the highest professional ideals rather than as prohibitions that must be followed;
  2. Act in accordance with the APA Ethical Principles for Psychologist and Code of Conduct, relevant laws, regulations, and policies governing health service psychology; and to
  3. Recognize ethical dilemmas as they arise and apply ethical decision-making processes in order to resolve the dilemmas.

Research

Research

Specialty

HIV Stigma, Global Mental Health

Group Information

In our Global Community Health Lab, we create, implement, and act on interdisciplinary behavioral science that broadens our understanding of the context of illness and well-being in global communities – with an emphasis on persons living with HIV/ AIDS. Projects include:

  • Sustained reconciliation between survivor and perpetrators of the 1994 genocide against Tutsis possible? A time-series evaluation of a peace-livelihood intervention in Kigali, Rwanda
  • Generational transmission of outgroup attitudes among children of survivors and perpetrators of the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi
  • Determinants of guardian willingness to utilize accessible mental health services for children and adolescents living in Ibadan, Nigeria. In partnership with the University of Ibadan, Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (C-CAMH)

Accomplishments

Accomplishments

Fulbright Specialist, 2022

University of Global Health Equity, Rwanda

Fulbright Specialist, 2016

University of Ibadan, Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Nigeria

Fulbright Specialist, 2013

University of Chiang Mai, Department of Pediatrics, Thailand

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH; 1R15 MH117631-01)

Improving Child Mental Health Service Utilization in Ibadan Nigeria Using a Community Based Participatory Research Approach (with Community Partner: University of Ibadan). Principle Investigator. 9/11/2018 – 9/10/2021

Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical and Translational Science (GHUCCTS) Pilot Grant, 2021

Living with HIV Across the Lifespan Shapes Treatment Views of Black Adults with Perinatal HIV Infection

Distinguished Faculty Award (Outstanding Scholar 2019-20)

Howard University, College of Arts & Sciences

Related Articles

Is outgroup prejudice passed down generationally in Rwanda after the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi?

Kang, E., Mbonyingabo, C., Qin, L., Charvonia, A.,* Snyder, J.,* Camelo Lopez, V.,* & Neal Kimball, C. (2022). Is outgroup prejudice passed down generationally in Rwanda after the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi? Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 28(1), 49-62. doi.org/10.1037/pac0000578.

If we build it, they will come: Caregiver decision to use an accessible outpatient psychiatric service for children and adolescents in Nigeria

Kang, E., Omigbodun, O., Oduguwa, A., Kim, W., Qin, L., Ogunmola, O, Akinkuotu, F.,* Derenoncourt, M.,* Abdurahman, H., Adejumo, O., Lawal, K., & Bella-Awusah, T. (2021). If we build it, they will come:  Caregiver decision to use an accessible outpatient psychiatric service for children and adolescents in Nigeria. Social Science & Medicine, 279(2021), 113972.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2021.113972.

Navigating stigma trajectory and mental health among young adults living with perinatal HIV in New York City

Kang, E., Mellins, C.A., Kim, W., Dolezal, C., Kindler, C.,* Leu, C.S., & Abrams, E.A. (2021). Navigating stigma trajectory and mental health among young adults living with perinatal HIV in New York City. AIDS & Behavior 25, 3712–3720. doi.org/10.1007/s10461-021-03166-3.

Knowledge of HIV transmission and illness stigma: A relationship revisited in rural Rwanda

Kang E., Delzell, D.A.P., & Mbonyingabo, C. (2017). Knowledge of HIV transmission and illness stigma: A relationship revisited in rural Rwanda. AIDS Education and Prevention, 29(6), 540-553.

Exposure to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and survivor attitudes towards génocidaires: 20-year post-script.

Kang E., Delzell, D.A.P., Mbonyingabo, C., & Ngendahayo, S. (2016). Exposure to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and survivor attitudes towards génocidaires: 20-year post-script. https://ezerkang.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/kang-2016-pc-22_356.pdf&qu…; target="_blank" title="kang-2016-pc-22_356">Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 22(4), 356-366

Poverty indicators and mental health functioning among adults living with HIV in Delhi, India

Kang, E., Delzell, D., McNamara, P.E., Cuffey, J., Cherian, & Matthew, S. (2016). Poverty indicators and mental health functioning among adults living with HIV in Delhi, India. AIDS Care, 28(4), 416-422. 

Factors associated with high rates of antiretroviral medication adherence among adolescents living with perinatal HIV in Thailand

Kang, E., Delzell, D., Chhabra, M., & Oberdorfer, P. (2015). Factors associated with high rates of antiretroviral medication adherence among adolescents living with perinatal HIV in Thailand. International Journal of STD and AIDS, 26(8), 534-541.

Disadvantaged neighborhood influences on anxiety and depression in children with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus: How life stressors matter

Kang, E., Mellins, C.A., Dolezal, C., Elkington, K.S., & Abrams, E.A. (2011). Disadvantaged neighborhood influences on anxiety and depression in children with perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus: How life stressors matter. Journal of Community Psychology, 39(8), 956-971.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) stigma: Spoiled social identity and Jürgen Moltmann’s trinitarian model of the imago Dei

Kang, E. (2015). Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) stigma: Spoiled social identity and Jürgen Moltmann’s trinitarian model of the imago Dei. International Journal of Public Theology, 9(2015), 289-312.

Influences of stigma and HIV transmission knowledge on member support for faith-placed HIV initiatives in Chinese immigrant Buddhist and Protestant religious institutions in New York City

Kang, E., Delzell, D., Chin, J.J., Behar, E., & Li, M.Y. (2013). Influences of stigma and HIV transmission knowledge on member support for faith-placed HIV initiatives in Chinese immigrant Buddhist and Protestant religious institutions in New York City. AIDS Education and Prevention, 25(5), 445-456.

Faith-based HIV care and prevention in Asian immigrant communities in New York City. Rhetoric or reality?

Kang, E., Chin, J.J., & Behar, E. (2011). Faith-based HIV care and prevention in Asian immigrant communities in New York City. Rhetoric or reality? Journal of Psychology & Theology, Special Issue “Faith in Practice: Reflections on Community Psychology in Action” 39, 268-279.

Standing between two worlds in Harlem: A developmental psychopathology perspective of perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus and adolescence

Kang, E., Mellins, C.A., Ng, WYK, Robinson, L.G. & Abrams, E.A. (2008). Standing between two worlds in Harlem: A developmental psychopathology perspective of perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus and adolescence. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 29(2008), 227-237.

Are psychological consequences of stigma enduring or transitory? A longitudinal study of HIV stigma and psychological distress among Asians and Pacific Islanders living with HIV illness?

Kang, E., Rapkin, B.D., & DeAlmeida C. (2006). Are psychological consequences of stigma enduring or transitory? A longitudinal study of HIV stigma and psychological distress among Asians and Pacific Islanders living with HIV illness. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 20(10), 712-723.

Multiple dimensions of HIV stigma and psychological distress among Asians and Pacific Islanders living with HIV illness

Kang, E., Rapkin, B.D., Remien, R.H., Mellins, C.A., & Oh, A. (2005). Multiple dimensions of HIV stigma and psychological distress among Asians and Pacific Islanders living with HIV illness. AIDS & Behavior, 9(2), 145-154.

The “demon plague” and access to care among undocumented Asian immigrants living with HIV disease in New York City

Kang, E., Rapkin, B., Springer, C. & Kim, H.J. (2003). The “demon plague” and access to care among undocumented Asian immigrants living with HIV disease in New York City. Journal of Immigrant Health, 5(2), 49-58.