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Faculty
Faculty

Ricky Ramon, MFA, MA, EdM (He/Him/His)

Lecturer of Theatre Arts

  • Theatre Arts
  • College of Fine Arts

Biography

Professor Ricky Ramón has directed and stage managed over 60 plays and musicals at Adventure Theatre, Atlantic Theater Company (NYC), Arena Stage, Signature Theatre (DC), Theater Alliance, Rorschach Theatre, Imagination Stage, Woolly Mammoth Theatre, and Teatro Vivo (Austin).  Ricky earned a Master of Education in Arts in Education from Harvard University, a Master of Fine Arts in Acting and Directing from Texas Tech University, and a Master of Arts in Performance Studies from NYU-Tisch School of the Arts.  He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theatre and English from the University of Notre Dame. Ricky currently teaches theatre in the Department of Theatre Arts in the Chadwick A. Boseman College of Fine Arts at Howard University.  He is a member of the Actors’ Equity Association. Ricky is originally from Pearsall, Texas.

Education & Expertise

Education

Arts in Education

Ed.M.
Harvard University
2007

Performance Studies

M.A.
New York University - Tisch School of the Arts
2006

Acting & Directing

M.F.A.
Texas Tech University
2003

Theatre & English

B.A.
University of Notre Dame
1999

Academics

Academics

Kinesthetic Character Development & Storytelling (THDN 067)

This is an acting course required for all first-year dance and musical theatre majors.  Students learn to use their bodies to create a character and tell a great story.  We specifically study clowning, Rasaboxes, and Viewpoints physical acting methods.  

Theatre History I - Before 1800 (THFD 180)

This course is required of all Theatre Arts majors, except Dance majors.  It is a suggested course for Theatre Arts minors. In this course, students learn the history of theatre before the year 1800. This course is designed to introduce students to the history of theatre traditions through an examination of major movements, trends, and styles in theatre and drama from antiquity through the late eighteenth century. We will explore both Eastern and Western theatrical traditions in relation to the specific temporal, spatial, social, cultural, religious, economic, and artistic fields from which these traditions emerged. Across time and space, theatrical moments have never existed in a vacuum; rather they happen in response and in relation to the world at the time of creation. As such, we will also critically assess the traditional Western theatre history narrative by interrogating the point of view of historians and by inviting in alternative perspectives and other histories. As envisioned, the course moves away from the concept of single-unit theatre history and progresses toward broader thinking of the topic as a series of theatre histories. This course will also introduce the procedures and principles that theatre historians follow in their research, analysis, interpretation, and writing. We will practice working with artifacts, developing and supporting hypotheses, constructing arguments, and contextualizing historical events.

Introduction to the Theatre (THFD 010)

This course is designed to introduce students to the art of theatre. This course aims to provide a general historical and practical foundation in theatre in order to cultivate a stronger understanding and appreciation of the various elements that come together to make-up theatrical events. As such, this course seeks to create more astute theatre viewers. In addition, this course will provide some opportunity to explore various roles of theatre practitioners through practical workshops, in-class exercises, course readings, and discussions.

Introduction to Acting for Non-Majors (THAC 020)

This course is designed to introduce students to acting in the theatre. This course aims to provide a general understanding of acting as a profession. This is a studio-work course:  Students will work with the professor in a one-on-one setting to workshop monologues and scenes throughout the five weeks. Experiential learning consists of psycho-physical exercises, theatre games, rehearsal, and the presentation of assigned work.  The reading and written assignments will aid the studio work. 

Introduction to Creativity (THFD 071) - formerly known as Creative Drama

This course is designed to radically enhance your ability to tap into and utilize your creative skills. This course will free students to explore their minds, voices, and bodies in an original and profoundly creative manner. Expressing yourself at the highest level of freedom and creativity at this point in your personal development is the course’s primary objective. Each student will be challenged to rid themselves of tension, improve their focusing skills, and take bold and spontaneous risks.

Theatre History II - After 1800 (THFD 181)

This course introduces students to the history of theatre traditions by examining significant movements, trends, and theatre styles from 1800 through the present moment. The course will include online assignments and will be taught asynchronously. The course will explore both Eastern and Western theatrical traditions. Across time and space, theatrical moments have never existed in a  vacuum; instead, they happen in response to and concerning the world at the time of creation. As such, we will also critically assess the traditional Western theatre history narrative by interrogating historians' points of view and inviting alternative perspectives and other histories. As envisioned, the course moves away from the concept of single-unit theatre history and progresses toward broader thinking of the topic as a series of theatre histories.

Accomplishments

Accomplishments

Distinguished Faculty Award for Full-Time Faculty for Outstanding Teaching

Professor Ricky Ramón is the recipient of the Distinguished Faculty Award for Full-Time Faculty for Outstanding Teaching from the College of Arts & Sciences in 2021.